Feedforward for GUIs

“What will happen if I click this button?”

We all know what feedback is and apply it continuously when designing and building (graphical) user interfaces. However, feedforward might be as important: underlying software systems became more complex over time and might exhibit unexpected or hard-to-predict behaviour because of the behaviour of the software (e.g. context-aware systems, systems that use AI, dynamic datasets etc.). On this page you can find a collection of papers that report on our research work to define, design and engineer feedforward, or predicting potential future outcomes, at the level of the UI toolkit. It’s all about answering the question on behalf of the user: “What will happen if I do this?”. This work received support from the Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO; project G0E7317N End-User Development of Intelligible Internet-of-Things Objects and Applications) and the Flemish Government under the “Onderzoeksprogramma Artificiële Intelligentie (AI) Vlaanderen” programme.

Core contributions

  1. Model-based Engineering of Feedforward Usability Function for GUI Widgets, David Navarre, Philippe Palanque, Sven Coppers, Kris Luyten, Davy Vanacken, Interacting with Computers, 19 pages.
  2. Fortunettes: Feedforward about the Future State of GUI Widgets, Sven Coppers, Kris Luyten, Davy Vanacken, David Navarre, Philippe Palanque, Christine Gris, The 11th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems (EICS 2019), Valencia, Spain, 2019. In The Proceedings of the ACM on Human Computer Interaction (HCI), Volume 3, Issue EICS, Article No. 20
  3. Crossing the Bridge over Norman’s Gulf of Execution: Revealing Feedforward’s True Identity, Nominated for CHI2013 Best Paper Award, Jo Vermeulen, Kris Luyten, Elise van den Hoven, Karin Coninx, In The ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2013, Paris, France, April 27 – May 2, 2013 [~20% acceptance (393/1963) [preview movie]

Related contributions & applied on different domains

  1. FORTNIoT: Intelligible Predictions to Improve User Understanding of Smart Home Behavior, Sven Coppers, Davy Vanacken, Kris Luyten, In Proc. ACM Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies (IMWUT) 4, 4, Article 124 (December 2020), 24 pages.
  2. Fortune Nets: Formal, Petri nets-based, Engineering of Fortunettes, David Navarre, Philippe Palanque, Sven Coppers, Kris Luyten, Davy Vanacken, 8th Formal Methods for Interactive Systems workshop (FMIS 2019), Porto, Portugal, 2019.
  3. Enhancing Patient Motivation through Intelligibility in Cardiac Tele-rehabilitation, Supraja Sankaran, Kris Luyten, Dominique Hansen, Paul Dendale, Karin Coninx, Interacting with Computers, 2019
  4. Intellingo: The Intelligible Translation Environment, Sven Coppers, Jan Van den Bergh, Kris Luyten, Karin Coninx, Iulianna van der Lek-Ciudin, Tom Vanallemeersch, Vincent Vandeghinste, The ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2018), Montreal, Canada, April 21-26, 2018 [~25,8% acceptance (667/2590)]
  5. Proxemic Flow: Dynamic Peripheral Floor Visualizations for Revealing and Mediating Large Surface Interactions. Jo Vermeulen, Kris Luyten, Karin Coninx, Nicolai Marquardt, Jon Bird, Interact 2015, Bamberg, Germany, September 14-18, 2015 [~30% acceptance; 307 submissions]
  6. Gestu-Wan – An Intelligible Mid-Air Gesture Guidance System for Walk-up-and-Use Displays. Gustavo Rovelo Ruiz, Donald Degraen, Davy Vanacken, Kris Luyten, Karin Coninx, Interact 2015, Bamberg, Germany, September 14-18, 2015 [~30% acceptance; 307 submissions]
  7. The Design of Slow-Motion Feedback, Jo Vermeulen, Kris Luyten, Karin Coninx, Nicolai Marquardt, ACM conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS) 2014, Vancouver, BC, Canada, June 21-15, 2014 [~26% acceptance (~104/402)]